Boa, Colombian or Brown Rainbow


Epicrates cenchria maurus


The brown rainbow boa, or Columbian boa, is a non-venomous snake found in Central and South America. They are red with dark leopard-like spots on the body, which fade as they mature. They grow to an average of four feet in length. Their name comes from the iridescent shine of their scales in the sunlight.

Family

Boidae

Order

Squamata

Class

Reptilia

Range

Central and South America

Habitat

Tropical Rainforests

Life Expectancy

Up to 20 years in captivity and 10 years in the wild.

Sexual Maturity

Brown rainbow boas become sexually mature at three to four years of age.

Diet

In the wild, they feed on small mammals, rodents, and birds. In the zoo, they are fed a diet of mice and rats.

Status

IUCN - Not Listed

Behaviors

Like most snakes, brown rainbow boas are a solitary species. They are nocturnal, spending their days hiding from predators. Their diets consist of rodents, birds, and small mammals. To locate prey, brown rainbow boas use their forked tongue to pick up and identify scents in their surroundings. They are also able to sense heat and vibrations. When they locate prey, they strike, coil, then constrict and suffocate before devouring the prey. They will also use their teeth to grip prey. Brown rainbow boas breed from October to January and are ovoviviparous. The eggs are fertilized internally and the young develop within the female throughout the gestation period. While developing, they gain nutrients from the yolk sac. At the end of the gestation period, 12 to 15 young are born fully developed.

Adaptions

Special Interests

Folklore

Conservation

Jacksonville Zoo History

Exhibit

Range of the Jaguar