Crane, Florida Sandhill


Grus canadensis pratensis


Florida Sandhill Cranes are long-legged, long-necked, with a bald patch at the top of their heads. The bald patch reveals red skin, distinguishing them from other cranes. Males are larger than females.

Family

Gruidae

Order

Gruiformes

Class

Aves

Range

Southeast Georgia and throughout Florida

Habitat

Open prairies, grasslands and wetlands

Life Expectancy

Some have been known to live up to 20 years.

Sexual Maturity

Diet

Sandhill cranes are omnivorous, feeding on seeds, grain, insects, and small vertebrates.

Status

IUCN - Least Concern

Behaviors

Sandhill cranes are monogamous breeders, usually laying 2 eggs. The incubation period lasts 29-32 days. The eggs are incubated by both parents. Sandhill cranes nest in areas with thick vegetation, usually shallow ponds or marshes. Shortly after hatching, the young are able to leave their nest with their parents to forage. At around 9-10 months, the young will leave their parents. Sandhill cranes are typically found in small groups or pairs. During migration or winter, they form much larger groups for roosting and feeding.

Adaptions

Special Interests

Folklore

Conservation

While Sandhill Cranes are listed by the IUCN as Least Concern, the Florida population is more of a concern, but not endangered.

Jacksonville Zoo History

Exhibit

Wild Florida